Last edited by Gardazil
Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of medieval moated sites of south-eastern Ireland found in the catalog.

medieval moated sites of south-eastern Ireland

counties Carlow, Kilkenny, Tipperary and Wexford

by Terence B. Barry

  • 301 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by British Archaeological Reports in Oxford, Eng .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Ireland,
  • Ireland.
    • Subjects:
    • Moats -- Ireland.,
    • Ireland -- Antiquities.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 234-247.

      StatementTerence B. Barry.
      SeriesBritish archaeological reports ;, 35
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDA920 .B35
      The Physical Object
      Pagination247 p. :
      Number of Pages247
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4608303M
      ISBN 100904531694
      LC Control Number77371742

      Search Tips. Phrase Searching You can use double quotes to search for a series of words in a particular order. For example, "World war II" (with quotes) will give more precise results than World war II (without quotes). Wildcard Searching If you want to search for multiple variations of a word, you can substitute a special symbol (called a "wildcard") for one or more letters. Tullykane, Co. Meath: a medieval rural settlement / Christine Baker (with appendices by Caroline Sands [and others]) --When mounds become castles: a case for the later usage of early medieval sites / Niall Brady --Cookstown, Co. Meath: a medieval rural settlement / Richard Clutterbuck (with appendices by Tim Holden [and others] --The.

        Evidence for this practice in early medieval Ireland, though, is limited. In the colophon for the Book of Durrow (TCD MS 57), for example, the scribe requests to be remembered in the prayers of ‘whoever holds in his hand this little book.’ 1 While this demonstrates that the smaller codices were meant to be held, whether reading them was. Medieval moated site The greatest proportion of archaeological features encountered at Shandon relate to Medieval activity. While nothing dateable was recovered from the sub-rectangular enclosure ditch itself, the discovery of 12th/13th century pottery from features inside and immediately outside the enclosure provides a strong case that the.

      This discussion covers castles, tower houses, moated sites, rural settlement, towns, and churches before describing trade and contact with Britain. Pottery imports are highlighted, concluding that Ireland is to be seen as anything but peripheral to the broader context of medieval Europe. This book investigates and reconstructs from archaeological evidence how early medieval Irish people lived together as social groups, worked the land as farmers, worshipped God, made and used ob.


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Medieval moated sites of south-eastern Ireland by Terence B. Barry Download PDF EPUB FB2

By Finbar Dwyer Published by New Island Press, Reviewer: John Dorney Medieval Ireland is a world that is lost to Medieval Moated Sites In Ireland In this essay Gearoid Phelan explores the Medieval moated sites in Ireland.

Medieval Moated Sites of S.E. Ireland. Oxford: British Archaeological Press; Duffy, S., Ireland in the Middle : MacMillan Press Ltd; Glasscock, R.E., Moated Sites and Deserted Boroughs and Villages; Two Neglected Aspects of Medieval moated sites of south-eastern Ireland book Settlement in Ireland. (An old copy, perhaps from a journal; no year or location of.

Medieval moated sites of south-eastern Ireland. Oxford, Eng.: British Archaeological Reports, (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Terence B Barry.

Medieval moated sites Issue 17 of CBA Research Report Series Issue 17 of Research report (Council for British Archaeology) Author: F. Aberg: Editor: F. Aberg: Publisher: Council for British Archaeology, ISBN:Length: 93 pages: SubjectsReviews: 1.

The Medieval Moated Sites of South-eastern Ireland: Counties Carlow Terence B. Barry Snippet view - Armagh and the Royal Centres in Early Medieval Ireland: Monuments, Cosmology 4/5(1).

Our Books; Our Authors; Submissions; News; The Irish Story Mailing List; Irish History; Today In Irish History; The Rising; The Irish Civil War; The Lockout; Currently browsing tag Moated Sites Medieval Moated Sites In Ireland. In this essay Gearoid Phelan explores the Medieval moated sites in Ireland.

(See also The Castle in the. C C Taylor (pp ) discusses the definition, form and classification of moated sites, including consideration of internal features and the provision of water for the moat. Recording and survey is dealt with by C J Bond () who states the basic aims and describes the preliminary work, the fieldwork and records, and post-survey analysis.

Square barrow cemetery, moated site, fishponds and medieval settlement remains at Scorborough is a Scheduled Monument in Leconfield, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

See why it was listed, view it on a map, see visitor comments and photos and share your own comments and photos of this building. The peak period during which moated sites were built was between about and and by far the greatest concentration lies in central and eastern parts of England.

However, moated sites were built throughout the medieval period, are widely scattered throughout England and exhibit a high level of diversity in their forms and sizes. Location. Ballymoty Motte is located km ( mi) south-southeast of Monageer, just south of the Ballyedmond River.

History. The motte was built in the late 12th century after the Norman invasion of Ireland. Description. Ballymoty Motte is round. Details. The monument includes a medieval moated site situated m north east of The Hall in the village of Burrough Green. The eastern corner of the moat ditch, together with a small portion of the south eastern moat arm and adjacent area of the island, have been largely removed by the construction of a school building and are, therefore, not included in the scheduling.

In this essay Gearoid Phelan explores the Medieval moated sites in Ireland. (See also The Castle in the Lordship of Ireland) The The Castle in the Lordship of Ireland, The Irish on the manors.

The native Irish can be divided into two categories: those who continued, where possible, to observe customary life-styles and land-holding practices, and another group, perhaps relatively small in number, who, as betaghs (native Irish living as serfs on a manor), became part of the feudal structure and, as economic assets, were recorded in manorial extents.

The defensive nature of Irish moated sites in, editor(s)John R. Kenyon and Kieran O' Conor, The Medieval Castle in Ireland and Wales, Dublin, Four Courts Press,pp -[T.B. Barry] Book. Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Medieval moated sites.

London: Council for British Archaeology, (OCoLC) The Grassroots Archaeology Project is a home-grown community-based initiative aiming to combine professional expertise and local support to discover the story of a forgotten monument.

The monument in question, a suspected medieval moated site, has been subsumed by the modern Seagrange housing estate where I grew up in suburban Dublin. Books. Sneyd, Steve,The Devil's Logbook Castles and Fortified Sites around South Yorkshire (Hilltop Press) p.

19 Le Patourel, H.E. Jean,The Moated Sites of Yorkshire (The Society for Medieval Archaeology Monograph Series 5) p. Periodical Articles. Dec, 'Wood Hall - Moated manor house' Current Archaeology Vol. The moated site comprises a square platform, 42 metres across, containing earthworks which reflect the positions of previous buildings.

It is surrounded by a deep moat, on average 15 metres wide and metres deep. The gatehouse was located at the south eastern corner of the platform. The excavation has the potential to rewrite the historical narrative of medieval Ireland.

In Julyfor the first time ever, this moated site will be unearthed by a team of student archeologists led by Professor Thomas J. Finan, Ph.D., Department of History, Saint Louis University. An award-winning film production crew from HEC-TV will. Site of a moated house dated by excavated finds to late C13 or early C The monument consists of a rectangular moat which contained a house and other buildings.

The buildings were demolished and the moat filled in in (PastScape) The site of Boarzell is indicated by a low amorphous platform c m square, surrounded by marshy ground. The Book. Lived Experience in the Later Middle Ages: Studies of Bodiam and Other Elite Landscapes in South-Eastern England is an edited volume, setting out the work of the project.

Table of Contents. List of Figures. Ten: Moated sites in the Weald.Scotney Castle is an English country house with formal gardens south-east of Lamberhurst in the valley of the River Bewl in Kent, England.

It belongs to the National Trust. The gardens, which are a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a celebrated example of the Picturesque style, are open to the public. The central feature is the ruins of a medieval, moated manor house, Scotney Old Castle.The monument includes the earthwork and buried remains of a medieval moated site, known as Cheswardine Castle, and an associated linear bank.

The moated site is considered to be the centre of the manor of Cheswardine which was granted to Hamo (Hamon) le Strange by Henry II in